Setting up your Raspberry Pi (headless)

Raspberry Pi Hardware List


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Billion 7800N SNMP OID’s

I’ve decided to graph my small home network, so I thought I would see if I could find the OID’s for my Billion 7800n Router, first I tried the Billion website, I was surprised not to find them there. I managed to find some information on other websites (not a huge lot), but it seems that Billion have changed the format of the information between firmware revision.

Billion 7800n SNMP Page

Billion 7800n SNMP Page

Assuming you’ve set up your router and installed snmp tools on your Linux workstation, this command will give you a list of all the OID’s.

If you can’t be bothered to install SNMP tools then feel free to grab the zip file of the results from the following Software Version 1.06e

[code lang=”bash”]snmpwalk -v1 -c public 192.168.1.254[/code]

As it happens, I’ll only be graphing a few of the salient attributes of the router, using either Cacti or Nagios in a home environment.

ADSL Status.

Upstream Speed (Gauge32): .1.3.6.1.2.1.10.94.1.1.2.1.8.3
Downstream Seed (Gauge32): .1.3.6.1.2.1.10.94.1.1.3.1.8.3

Upstream SNR (Integer): .1.3.6.1.2.1.10.94.1.1.2.1.4.3
Downstream SNR (Integer): .1.3.6.1.2.1.10.94.1.1.3.1.4.3

Upstream Line Attenuation (Gauge32): .1.3.6.1.2.1.10.94.1.1.2.1.5.3
Downstream Line Attenuation (Gauge32): .1.3.6.1.2.1.10.94.1.1.3.1.5.3

System Uptime (Timeticks): .1.3.6.1.2.1.25.1.1.0

Interface Statistics.

Ethernet interface eth0
String: “eth0” .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.6
RX bytes (String): .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.10.6
TX bytes (String): .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.16.6

Ethernet interface eth1
String: “eth1” .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.7
RX bytes (String): .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.10.7
TX bytes (String): .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.16.7

Ethernet interface eth2
String: “eth2” .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.8
RX bytes (String): .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.10.8
TX bytes (String): .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.16.8

Ethernet interface eth3
String: “eth3” .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.9
RX bytes (String): .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.10.9
TX bytes (String): .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.16.9

Wireless interface ra0
String: “ra0” .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.8
RX bytes (String): .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.10.8
TX bytes (String): .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.16.8

Bridge interface br0
String: “br0” .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.2.9
RX bytes (String): .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.10.9
TX bytes (String): .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.16.9

Backing up your wordpress mysql file and encrypting it for offsite storage.

This is reminder to myself (but if it’s usefull, then feel free).

Forgot the name of the database (Duh!) 😀

Backup wordpress MySQL database

Encrypt using gpg for offsite storage, remember your not using your (or someone’s) public key to encrypt the file, your using a specific password so…

Hint: Keep a note of the password. 😀

The encryted file will have a gpg extension, so in my case it’s called “wordpress.sql.gpg”.

How to Decrypt the file

Will give you 2 files, the original encrypted wordpress.sql.gpg file, and the unencryped wordpress.sql file.

References:
Encrypting and decrypting documents
Backup and Restore MySQL Databases

Installing Wireshark on Ubuntu 12.04 LTS

Installing wireshark on Ubuntu 12.04 LTD and limiting packet capture to one group, in this case the group wireshark. I’m sure you can use these instructions for other debian based distributions.

Although you’ll have to take it as read that I’ve only tested it on Ubuntu, feel free to let me know if it doesn’t and I’ll amend the instructions to suit.

First, we install Wireshark from the terminal.
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