Setting up a Raspberry Pi as an IPv6 gateway using Hurricane Electric.

First thing you’ll need to do is register at the Hurricane Electric Website and create your own tunnel. I’m not going to go over that since there’s a lot of help on the Hurricane Electric Website about it. These instructions only apply to you, after you’ve registered as a user, and set up your tunnel on their website.

Take a note of your Tunnel details from the Hurricane Electric website, you’ll need them to set up your Linux IPv6 Gateway. The IPv6 addresses are used for documentation purposes only, see RFC 3849 (no point showing everyone on the Internet my home IPv6 address range).

HE Server IPv4 Endpoint 216.66.80.26
Static IPv6 assignment from my routable range 2001:DB8:8:7aa::1
Client IPv6 Endpoint 2001:DB8:7:7aa::2

Ok first thing to do is enable IPv6 support on your raspberry pi, at the prompt type.

To make the change permanent, you will have to edit the modules file and have your pi load it at start-up (reboot). To do this edit the modules file, type the following.

Your modules file should look similar to this after to append the “ipv6” line at the end.

You need to edit /etc/network/interfaces and add your own data to the bottom of the file. Two bits of data, the first bit goes after your own network adaptor (usually eth0). and the second part after that.

  • Adding static IPv6 address from my routable range.
  • Adding the Hurricane Electric Tunnel interface (called he-ipv6)
  • Please note that the IP’s are on different networks.

The IPv6 and IPv4 setting below will of course be yours and not the ones I’ve made up for the purpose of showing how it’s done 🙂

Now we’ll deal with DNS, you have two options, you can either use your ISP’s DNS server and hope that it’s set up to deal with IPv6 resolution, or you can use free public recursive DNS servers. I’m going to use Google’s public recursive DNS servers which I know work.

To set this up, you’ll need to edit the /etc/resolv.conf file and add the DNS servers in. Type the following at the prompt.

Add the following and save.

Testing the Tunnel

Before we go any further, were going to bring the tunnel up and test it.

At the prompt, type the following.

To test, type the following.

You should get similar results to me.

If your results are similar to above then your raspberrypi is connected to the IPv6 Internet (Hurrah!) :-). If not then check your IPv6 settings and ask for help on the HE forum here.

Now we need to bring the interface down, we’ll bring it back up again after we’ve firewalled it.

References:

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Enabling IPv6 privacy extension on Ubuntu Desktop 10.04

The IPv6 standards define an algorithm to generate temporary random IPv6 addresses that are less traceable over time. This is documented in RFC 4941 “Privacy Extensions for Stateless Address Autoconfiguration in IPv6”. The following instructions apply to a network card called eth0, if your is different, then change to suit.

To enable the use of Privacy Extension under Ubuntu and other Debian derivatives, you need to edit the following. Continue reading

IPv6 – Disabling isatap Teredo and 6to4 in Windows 7

To disable isatap teredo and 6to4 on a Windows 7 workstation, type the following at the prompt. You do of course need Administrative access on the workstation to do this.

If like myself your running dual stack IPv6 via your router or gateway, then there is really no need to have them running.

Thanks for the input guys, I’ve changed the following to set it back to default.

To re-enable isatap teredo nd 6to4, just replace the disabled with type=default.

References:
ISATAP – Wikipedia
6to4 – Wikipedia

Setting up IPv6 radvd and dibbler to work together on Ubuntu 10.04

Unfortunately a lot of devices don’t pass on RDNS information from radvd  even though it’s included in the RFC. The best it can do is a default gateway and an IPv6 address. You are supposed to be able to pass RDNS information, but I’ve found that the devices that I’ve tried (Windows 7 and Android Gingerbread, still don’t support that part of the Request for Comment) hence the use of DHCPv6.

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Setting up a IPv6 Gateway on Hurricane Electric using Ubuntu 10.04.2

First thing you’ll need to do is register at the Hurricane Electric website and create your tunnel. I’m not going to go over that since there’s a lot  of help on the Hurricane Electric Website about it. These instructions only apply to you after you’ve registered as a user and set up your tunnel on there website.

These instruction’s  apply to Debian and Ubuntu derivatives, I’m sure they will work for other distributions with a little tweaking. Thanks to angelou on the Hurricane Electric web forum for doing most of the hard work. These instructions are mostly his work, with ufw firewall instructions are provided by me.

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Setting up IPv6 access for a home network using Ubuntu Linux

Before starting this howto, I would suggest that you get IPv6 working by following the instructions here. If you’ve followed all the instructions in the previous post, you should now have a linux workstation that allows you to view IPv6 websites.

If you want to extend this ability and enable all the workstations on your network to have the same ability then feel free to follow the instructions provided.

First things first, you need to register with Freenet6 who will be your IPv6 tunnel provider, the registration page is here. Take a note of your password and username, you will need this later. Continue reading

Setting up IPv6 access for a home workstation under Ubuntu Linux

My current home workstation is running Ubuntu 10.04 LTS, but I’m sure you should be able to adapt the following to run on debian or other Ubuntu flavours.

This part only applied to setting up a single workstation, at some point, I’m going to set up my linux home server, to act at an IPv6 gateway for all the IPv6 enabled home devices.

First we have to install the IPv6 gateway client.

The default installation connects to Freenet automatically and anonymously so that should be it. Continue reading